Limboing Right Under The Knife

It appears that all my hopes, and efforts to regain movement of my left arm and shoulder have aligned me in a most precarious way.

I’ve bobbed and weaved, danced and waved, moving as if flowing with the pulsing beat, of the limbo drums, leaning back, almost horizontal, below those flames (or in this case, the blade)

 I so desperately wanted to avoid (Look Ma, no hands!, and no shoulder either!) as all concentration resulted in a dangling arm, it’s hand limply dragging a trail in the dirt.

Here I thought I was being so impressive,

“look doc, I can lean way back like this!”,

to which his response was:

“Yes, Impressive, but what’s this line in the dirt I can see left behind you?”                           

“OH, You saw that….”  I gave it my best “Look, I can move it like this, and like that, and that’s a big improvement!”                                                                                                                                       “Yes, however you still cannot move it like this!” as he raised my arm and a lightning bolt of pain shot through me, then subsided. To which I sheepishly stated:        

“but look, I can at least get it up that high now.”                                                                                            

“On it’s own?”                                                                                                                                    

“Well, if I use the other arm to help it” — then just a long look with a knowing smile.                                       

“So maybe we could tie a pole to your back with a pully on the top and a rope, and you could just pull the rope whenever you needed to raise the other arm” Mimicing this motion and crossing his eyes. “You could look for work as a Marionette….<smiles> look, you’re not a puppet…..”

“*SIGH* so that’s it then, theres no fighting it, surgery it is?” *Knods*                                                     

“You’ll be down about 8 weeks, with absolutely no use of that arm for 4 of those weeks, then after 4 weeks I’ll only allow typing, absolutely no lifting, not even it’s own weight…..”                                                                                                                                      ***SIGH**

So there it is, I have to go under the knife. It’s the not officially on paper yet verdict, but straight from the horses mouth.

-Doc

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6 Weeks and still fighting (update on condition after crash)

It’s been 6 weeks since the accident now, and while I said I walked away with only a broken thumb and some soreness, it isn’t that cut and dried. That soreness has taken all this time to go away, and it’s left behind muscles that can’t do what they used to, that scream out sharply when moved in a way they are no longer used to.

This picture totally sums it up for me:

I had limitations of movement that are now getting better but I have to work at it, in much discomfort at times. The right arm which couldn’t be lifted more than half way, can now be raised fully, and moved completely, however, it’s still stiff, and complains.

The left arm I could move at the elbow, up and down, but I couldn’t move it at all from the shoulder. I can now move it about 3 or 4 inches, but with much concentration to get it to do so, (and a good half minute or so) and usually with a wild pang of pain. I learned from Doc Roth that the scans show the top shoulder bone was shattered and the shattered bone pieces actually sliced through part of the muscle. The part that attaches the muscle to the shoulder.

 

This seems to be repairing itself now, slowly. In addition to that, ever since the accident, the skin over the muscle between the shoulder and elbow is numb. I will feel itches, but when I scratch where the itch is, I can’t feel the scratching. I also had a co-worker lightly tap me with the flat of a fist 2 times and say, “you hang in there” (then realized he tapped on the bad arm and said, OMG, I’m so sorry) I pretended it was nothing, but for the split seconds of each time he barely touched that spot, it felt like the skin was being pushed down into broken glass. I later non chalantly leaned against a doorway, only to howl in pain, as I once again felt the ground glass under the skin.

A simple thing like putting socks on was barely doable right after the accident, but working at it each day, I can now say I can reach the end of both feet without having to walk my fingers down the leg and foot, ending in a feeling of stretched pain. In fact, it’s been wonderful, until today, when suddenly halfway through pulling the sock on, the left shoulder jerked, like the muscle had snapped, leaving me with a pain that felt like the muscle had fallen off the bone and there was now a hole where it used to be. All normal healing I suppose.

The other issue, that’s given me the most trouble, and went un-noticed until I returned home and began walking more; Bruising internally of the left hip. this bruising caused enoumous swelling, and my hip swelled up so much it was pinching the sciatic nerve and was causing some real discomfort and keeping me from sleeping well. Orders then became, stay at home, off your feet until the swelling is gone, “it won’t heal until you get off your feet completely for a period of time”. It’s been probably almost 3 weeks now, and most of the swelling is gone, but it’s still there and still causing pain by pressing on that nerve. Groceries had to be gotten today, and while it was limited to a very few desperately needed items, by the time I got home, I was in pain, and having trouble walking.

This has been no cake walk,

(after sleeping, or periods of being off my feet, or when driving, when I get up, or get to my feet, it’s like an old man. Stiff, and legs that don’t move much, and complain about being moved. It’s almost like I need a walker those first few steps)

but I’m alive! Like I told the docs, get rid of that excruciating shoulder pain, and I can deal with whatever comes, and that’s exactly what I’m doing.

In fact the time off has been much needed, and I’ve found ways to completely enjoy it. (I was bored silly at first, it was driving me crazy, but the first week I pretty much slept anyway) but these will be the topics of the next post.

So, I would now ask that we all pay our respects to a trusty steed, that after 30 years of life, was taken in the line of duty. Magna, you will be missed.

-Doc